Shabti of Sennedjem in its coffin. New Kingdom, Dynasty 19, reign of Sety I – Ramesses II, ca. 1290 – 1213 B. C.

Wood, limestone, painted
Shabti: h. 19,5 cm; w. 5,3 cm; th. 3,5 cm. Coffin: l. 25,3 cm; w. 10,5 cm; th. 6,5 cm. Lid of the coffin: l. 24,5 cm; w. 9,4 cm; th. 4,3 cm
Purchased from Vladimir Golenischev,provenance: Thebes, Deir el-Medineh, TT 1
I.1.a 1662
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An ushabti is a wooden, stone, clay, or faience figurine depicting a swathed mummy or a person in
clothes, with its arms crossed on the chest, picks in its hands, and often with a basket on its back. These
magical figurines were supposed to come to life in the afterworld to carry out heavy physical work
instead of the deceased. The surface of ushabti figures was often decorated with an inscription – a
fragment of chapter 6 of the Book of the Dead: "Oh ushabti, if I am made to do any work they do in the
other world... you must do the work they do...You have to say: I want to do it, I'm here".
Sen-nedjema was a manager at the construction of royal tombs in the Valley of the Kings in
Thebes. During the 19th and the 20th dynasty the workers and managers of the necropolis lived on
the western bank of the Nile in a special settlement called "The place of truth" (today – Deir el-
Medina). A necropolis for the residents of the settlement was situated near it.

  • Wood, limestone, painted
    Shabti: h. 19,5 cm; w. 5,3 cm; th. 3,5 cm. Coffin: l. 25,3 cm; w. 10,5 cm; th. 6,5 cm. Lid of the coffin: l. 24,5 cm; w. 9,4 cm; th. 4,3 cm
  • At the PMFA since 1911
    Purchased from Vladimir Golenischev,provenance: Thebes, Deir el-Medineh, TT 1
  • I.1.a 1662
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